Tag Archives: food

My Kitchen Gadget Addiction

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See how nice and neat these egg and avocado slices are? Because gadgets!

Confession: I have a kitchen gadget addiction. I hoard everything from the tiniest garlic chopper to counter-hogging “small” appliances like the air fryer. I have a particular weakness for the little plastic single-purpose thingies that are among those celebrity chef Alton Brown despises and rants against in this hilarious video.

He’s right. I know he’s right; all you really need is a great knife. It’s just that he’s coming from the perspective of someone who’s had years of training and experience wielding pointy kitchen utensils, probably drinks less wine than I do and is definitely not perimenopausal, which lends a charming unpredictability to all of my endeavors, kitchen and otherwise.

I used to be firmly anti-gadget, constantly battling clutter in my too-small kitchen. Somewhere along the way my resistance evaporated and here I am, contemplating a cake pop maker.

Here are my current favorite kitchen gadgets in order of favoriteness. (Note: These are just little handheld gadgets, the gateway drug to small appliances and mixer attachments, which are posts in themselves.)

OXO avocado slicer. Yes, I own the exact same gadget that appears in the above video. I eat a lot of avocados. They present varying degrees of cooperation ranging from mushy to underripe, and if you’re dealing with an uncooperative, underripe avocado, pulling the pit out and trying to peel the skin off with a knife can be time-consuming and, for me at least, dangerous. Enter the OXO avocado slicer. It has a perfectly adequate yet not life-threatening blade on one end—the kitchen version of kindergarten scissors—and a slicer on the other end that gets all of the avocado out of the peel in nice thin slices, perfect for toast. Even when you want chunkier pieces for a salad or smoothie, the pit remover in the middle is a great way to avoid accidental amputations.

KitchenAid egg slicer. This is basically the same thing as the strawberry slicer in Alton’s video. I saw the cute red gadget on the wall at Target and grabbed it mostly because it was cute and red. Then I realized how much fun it is to slice eggs and other things as well: Strawberries and olives are frequent flyers. Sure, slicing with a knife is not hard, but this is more fun and satisfies my obsessive-compulsive desire for neat, same-sized slices.

Lekue microwave omelet maker. I picked this up at Publix on a whim when we were eating low carb, which meant making a lot of mini “quiches” in muffin tins for breakfast. I was tired of cleaning the muffin pans, and sometimes we’d run out of mini quiches before the end of the week. I thought it would be nice to throw some eggs and veggies into the microwave for a couple of minutes. It’s been great for those (many) times that I don’t get around to advance go-breakfast prepping.

Genius Nicer Dicer. I own a much simpler, older version than the kit they offer now, but same principle. It’s another great gadget for OCD foodies because it cuts perfect little same-size squares, which make a beautiful mango salsa, for example. The smaller size is perfect for dicing hot peppers without getting the oil all over your hands. It also dices onion neatly (as opposed to the food processor. Or me.) and eliminates all the crying.

Avocado Toast

1 slice Ezekiel 7 Sprouted Grains Bread, toasted
1/2 tablespoon Chosen Foods Coconut Oil Mayo (or your favorite mayo; I just like this one)
1/2 ripe avocado, sliced thinly
dash Penzey’s Sunny Spain seasoning

Spread mayo on one side of toast. Slice avocado and fan across toast. Sprinkle with Sunny Spain seasoning.

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Eggless Zucchini Cannelloni

When I was single and lived alone, I ate a lot of frozen dinners. They had names that included “Lean” (because low-fat was healthy) and “Healthy” (because healthy was healthy), so clearly this was the right thing to do. I remember running into someone at the grocery store with my cart full of low-fat frozen dinners, low-fat snacks and diet sodas and they commented, “Wow, you eat healthy!” and they weren’t even being sarcastic.

These days I don’t eat a lot of frozen dinners, but I was recently reminded of one I really liked back in the day.

I got a KitchenAid Vegetable Sheet Cutter attachment for Christmas and was searching for things I could make with zucchini that my son would eat. I ran across a photo of beef-filled cannelloni with a white sauce and immediately recalled that favorite frozen dinner, and became obsessed with trying to create a zucchini version of it. I think this comes pretty close. It is not low-fat ’cause I’m not into that anymore. It is eggless, so you could probably throw an egg into the filling and make it more firm if you’re not trying to feed a teenager who’s allergic to eggs and suspicious of vegetables. He ate it all, so I’m calling this one a win.

Zucchini Beef Cannelloni by Laurie Sterbens

Zucchini Beef Cannelloni with Bechemel Sauce

Cannelloni

1 pound large zucchini, sliced into sheets
1/2 cup minced onion
1/4 cup minced celery
1/4 cup minced carrot
1 tablespoons olive oil
1 cloves garlic, minced
16 ounces lean ground beef
1/4 cup white wine
1/4 cup beef broth
1 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
1 bay leaf
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste
1 cup shredded mozzarella

Bechamel Sauce

1 1/2 cups low-fat milk
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/8 teaspoon white pepper
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1 dash paprika
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Slice zucchini using Vegetable Sheet Cutter. Cut into 4- to 5-inch sheets and place on paper towels. Sprinkle with a little salt and set aside, then press with paper towels to remove excess moisture before filling.
3. Heat the olive oil in a deep skillet. Add onion, celery, and carrot, and cook over moderate heat until softened. Add the garlic, and cook 1 minute. Add beef. Cook, stirring occasionally, until meat is no longer pink. Add wine, and reduce for 1 minute. Stir in broth. Add herbs, bay leaf, and salt and pepper. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. Uncover, and reduce until almost dry. Discard bay leaf. Set aside to cool.
4. Transfer the cooled meat mixture to a large bowl. Stir in mozzarella.
5. To make bechamel sauce: In a small saucepan, add milk. While whisking, slowly add in flour. When blended, add salt, pepper, nutmeg and cayenne; bring to a boil over medium-high heat, whisking constantly. Reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and and stir in Parmesan.
6. Spoon 1/4 cup of the filling down the center of one zucchini slice, roll to enclose the filling and place in a buttered gratin dish. Repeat with the remaining zucchini slices and filling, arranging in single layer. Ladle the bechamel sauce over the cannelloni, and sprinkle with the remaining Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle with a bit of paprika.
7. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes or until bubbling. Run under the broiler about 4 inches from the heat for 2 minutes, or until golden.

Kinder, Gentler Cauliflower Rice

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This recipe for Cashew Chicken is an excellent reason for cauliflower rice.

About a year ago, my husband and I did a 30-day Paleo challenge.

  • Pros: Lost some belly fat, found great new healthy recipes.
  • Cons: Lots of planning, prep and cooking, not super travel-friendly, not cheap. Also not supposed to have dairy or alcohol. More on that later.

For the uninitiated, the Paleo Diet is based on what humans ate before the Agricultural Age and way before our current era, the Additive Age. The theory is that the human body wasn’t meant to process agricultural products, especially now that the food production industry has turned even originally healthy foods like grains into bionic alien pseudo foods. You’re supposed to eat clean, grass-fed meats, wild-caught fish and organic produce and avoid processed foods, grains, legumes, dairy and refined sugar.

I eventually failed dairy because coffee and cheese, but I definitely felt better without grains. Now I just try to eat Paleo during the week with limited dairy. Also not sure which era was when we learned about fermented grapes, but I’m pretending that happened.

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A house divided: Not everyone was on board with the Paleo plan.

The first thing you’ll learn when you go Paleo is that there are a lot of recipes out there trying to make something good you used to eat, like pasta, out of a vegetable you’re not that attached to, like zucchini. That low-carb classic, faux mashed potatoes made with cauliflower, is still around. Rice is another Paleo problem, and people have turned to cauliflower to solve that, too.

At first I was not a fan. Rice is a starchy comfort food, so, ideally, it shouldn’t break your teeth. Most recipes say pulse it in the food processor until it’s the size of rice, then saute it in oil, but all I got was warmer, oilier, mostly raw cauliflower.

I found that partially steaming the cauliflower first results in a softer, more rice-like texture.  Here’s how I make it now:

Cauliflower Rice

1 head cauliflower, cored and chopped
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon coconut or olive oil
Salt and pepper

Place the chopped cauliflower in a microwave-safe dish with 2 tablespoons of water. Cover and microwave on high for 8 minutes. Remove immediately, uncover and allow to cool.

Place 1/2 of cooled cauliflower in a large food processor and pulse until it resembles rice. Repeat with remaining cauliflower. Heat coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat and add cauliflower to skillet. Saute 5 minutes or until desired tenderness. Add salt and pepper to taste.

(Note: When this post was first published, cauliflower rice was a new thing. Now you can find pre-riced cauliflower in the produce section, which takes you right back to the non-steamed, too-crunchy problem. However, now there are also bags of cauliflower rice in the frozen vegetable section, which you can just throw in the microwave, and they are a win. I like Green Giant. The bags are small, though, so I usually use two.)

 

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