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Easy Sweet Potato Lasagna

Serving of sweet potato lasagna on white plate with basil leaf garnish.The other day I saw a recipe for sweet potato lasagna online that looked good and would also be an excuse to use my Vegetable Sheet Cutter, so I uploaded it to my recipe planner, thinking I might make it and share it here if it turned out well.

A few days later I opened up the recipe and actually read the ingredients and, in what seems to be an emerging pattern, immediately changed everything about it and made a completely different thing. At least it still has sweet potatoes.

In all fairness to me, the original recipe contained tofu and nutritional yeast, a combination that I had a Very Bad Experience with once. I’m not vegan, so I’m gonna leave that trauma in the past where it belongs.

The other thing is, the recipe wanted me to make sauce from scratch. I get it; lasagna is kind of a big deal thing that grandma made and it can be very special. But most of the time my M.O. with cooking is to streamline things as much as possible. There are so many great organic jar sauces available now, so I say save the extra work for a weekend when you have access to good tomatoes.

In the end, I didn’t use the Vegetable Sheet Cutter. I had very large sweet potatoes and it looked like it was going to be a battle to get the skewer through them, and I was afraid of damaging the attachment or skewering myself. The next best thing would be the mandoline, but I hadn’t used mine in a long time (confession: I’m afraid of it) and discovered it was broken. I ended up slicing the potatoes with a trusty chef’s knife. Alton Brown would approve of my lack of gadgetry. That said, I’d recommend the mandoline because you’ll need to get the potatoes very thin.

Note: You can use an egg in the filling. Since we have the egg allergy, I used VeganEgg egg substitute.

Easy Sweet Potato Lasagna

Olive oil
VeganEgg egg substitute (recipe for 1 egg), or 1 large egg, beaten
16 ounces shredded mozzarella, divided
15 ounces ricotta
Pinch of grated nutmeg
3 cups baby spinach leaves
1 pound ground beef
1 32-ounce jar of marinara sauce
8 ounces sliced button mushrooms
Italian seasoning (optional: I like Penzey’s Tuscan Sunset)
Freshly grated Parmesan
2 very large or 3 medium white sweet potatoes, sliced thin

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 13×9-inch baking dish with olive oil.
Mix the egg substitute. (I use a blender.) In a food processor combine the egg substitute, ricotta and 8 ounces of shredded mozzarella. Grate in a pinch of nutmeg. Process until just combined. Add baby spinach and process until all the spinach is chopped, but don’t overprocess.
In a large skillet, brown ground beef, breaking into small pieces. Add sauce and mushrooms and cook over medium heat until mushrooms are cooked but not overcooked. Sprinkle in Italian seasoning if desired.
Spread a thin layer of marinara sauce on the bottom of the baking dish. Cover bottom of dish with a layer of sweet potato slices. Top with a layer of spinach mixture, followed by a layer of the marinara mixture. Repeat with remaining layers. Top last layer of marinara mixture with remaining shredded mozzarella.
Cover with nonstick aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour. Uncover and increase heat to 400 degrees for 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Allow to cool for 15 minutes before slicing and serving.

 

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SeaWorld shark dive not so scary

 “Cage goes in the water, you go in the water. Shark’s in the water. Our shark. Farewell and adieu to you fair Spanish ladies…” — Quint, “Jaws”

Laurie Sterbens in the shark tank at SeaWorld Orlando

This photo was taken by a SeaWorld Orlando employee from inside the Sharks Grill Restaurant during my Sharks Deep Dive in 2006. In the cage behind the flashed-out reef sharks, I'm the headless black smudge wearing a white helmet on the left.

Commercials on Discovery Channel this week are putting a toothy spin on an old Christmas song by touting Shark Week as “the most wonderful time of the year.” I love Christmas, but I have to admit that I really do look forward to Shark Week all year long.

Coincidentally, it was a Christmas gift that led me to my closest encounter with sharks so far. My husband, Scott, presented me with a gift certificate for the Sharks Deep Dive at SeaWorld Orlando. With the wrong kind of husband, this kind of gift might send you through the house looking for new insurance policies, but Scott is a good guy who just accepts the fact that he has chosen to spend his life with a serious shark geek.

I’ve always loved sharks despite spending most of my life in landlocked Arkansas. Oddly, my career path in newspapers led me to Daytona Beach, Fla., area, which you may have heard described as Shark Bite Capital of the World. It has occurred to me on more than one occasion that this could be either a gift from God or a clear sign that I am hurtling toward some bloody underwater destiny.

Actually, this Shark Bite Capital of the World business is a lot of nonsense. As big a fan as I am of Shark Week, it’s a little irritating to see an area hyped as super-dangerous when the truth is a lot of “attacks” are because an inlet that is a nursery for baby sharks is also a popular surf spot. Juvenile sharks mistake surfers’ feet for fish, which sometimes results in a bite wound that might get a bandage but doesn’t keep the surfers out of the water for long.

There have been more serious attacks in the past, of course, but honestly, I see a lot of tourists doing things that increase their risk — swimming in the early morning or evening, getting in water full of baitfish, swimming out too far. Years ago, before I lived in Florida, I visited Fort Walton Beach with a friend and she remarked one day, “I don’t go out past the sandbar. That’s where the big fish swim.” That stuck in my mind as a sensible policy.

Shark Soup by Laurie Sterbens for the Daytona Beach News-Journal

I wrote about my shark dive experience for The Daytona Beach News-Journal in 2006. Illustration by Marianne Koch.

Anyway, like I said, I’ve never even seen a shark here. Thus the desire to get into the tank at SeaWorld, where their Sharks Deep Dive was my best chance for seeing sharks close-up without having a scuba certification.

Despite having never been in the water with live sharks, my many years of shark geekdom and Discovery Channel addiction had left me slightly jaded. Aquariums are always full of nurse sharks, which seem like big catfish. (Although I’ve been watching a lot of “River Monsters” and I’m not sure I’d be all that comfortable in the water with a 10-foot catfish, either.) Another aquarium favorite is the sand tiger, which has a mouthful of menacing-looking teeth but seems kind of slow and guppylike to me.

I checked the International Shark Attack file before my dive and learned that the sand tiger was credited with 76 attacks on humans, 30 unprovoked and two fatal, between 1580 and 2005 and that the nurse shark was credited with 47 attacks — 10 unprovoked and none fatal. However, it was noted that shark attack figures are skewed to easily identifiable species, meaning that lesser-known sharks could be going around biting people and letting sand tigers take the blame. So, guppies and catfish or toothy terrors? I’d soon find out.

When I arrived at the Shark Encounter, I was taken into a brief orientation where I learned that the Shark Encounter tank included more than 50 sharks (the website now says 30) of various species, including of course, nurse sharks and sand tigers, but also blacktip reef sharks, whitetip reef sharks, saw sharks and Australian leopard sharks. Blacktips!, I thought. Now we’re talking! They’re not “Jaws” but they at least had “Open Water” cred.

After the orientation I donned a wetsuit and boots and entered what looked like a kiddie pool, where I was put into a white helmet, kind of a cross between old-fashioned deep-sea diver and Storm Trooper. This would allow me to breathe underwater and communicate with the SeaWorld staff member operating the cage or the staff member going into the cage with me.

I jumped down into the cage and there I was, surrounded by sharks. The cage isn’t like the shark cages you see on TV; the viewing area is clear plastic so you can’t stick your arm out like I probably would have done. The cage is attached to a track across the rear of the tank and slowly moves from one end of the tank to the other and back.

On the floor of the tank in front of me, I could see a tunnel where Scott was waving at me and trying desperately to take a photo with both me and a shark in it while navigating the moving sidewalk and trying not to knock people over. This was so amusing I was momentarily distracted from the sharks and just watched Scott. Later I saw him standing behind the window of Sharks Underwater Grill restaurant, where he was allowed to take photos alongside the SeaWorld photographer. None of the photos turned out that great, as you can see from the one I’ve included in this post. That was the official photo that we purchased.

As the cage moved slowly across the 125-foot tank, a 10-foot sawfish swam up to and over the cage, and large nurse and sand tiger sharks swam near the cage as well. The blacktip reef sharks and blacktips stayed farther away but did venture closer a couple of times, while the whitetip reef sharks napped on the bottom of the tank.

Despite being surrounded by large carnivorous predators, I found watching the gracefully swimming fish while listening to the aquarium sounds to be relaxing. The effect on me was less thrilling wild animal encounter than spa treatment, but that’s a good thing, too.

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