Cooking

Eggless Air Fryer Breakfast Pockets

Lately I’ve been playing around with my new air fryer a lot. Partly because it’s a fun new gadget, partly because some of the things I’ve made in it so far have been amazing, such as baked potatoes and chicken wings.

Another thing I’m always messing around with is trying to make eggless versions of things that my son, who’s allergic, would like to eat. I recently posted about discovering VeganEgg, which is pretty much the answer to an eggless cook’s prayers. It looks, acts and even smells like real eggs.

I decided to try to make an eggless version of breakfast pockets in the air fryer, which, if they worked, would make a great go-breakfast for my son. These turned out to be such a hit with both my son and my non-allergic, non-vegan husband that we didn’t have any left for go breakfasts. So I guess that’s a win.

We’re not vegetarian so I used turkey sausage, but veggie crumbles would easily work if you don’t eat meat.

Two triangle-shaped pastries on a white plate.

Eggless Air Fryer Breakfast Pockets with VeganEgg, sausage and cheddar.

Eggless Air Fryer Breakfast Pockets

Cooking spray
4 ounces breakfast sausage
4 tablespoons VeganEgg egg substitute
1 cup ice-cold water
salt and pepper
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1 tablespoons melted butter, or ghee
2 8-oz packages Pillsbury Crescent dough

Spray a medium nonstick skillet with cooking spray and add sausage. Cook until no longer pink, breaking into crumbles with spatula.
Eggless_Air_Fryer Breakfast_PocketsAdd cold water to blender then VeganEgg powder. Blend well. Mixture will resemble cake batter.
Spray a medium skillet (heavy stainless works best) with cooking spray. Add VeganEgg mixture and cook over medium high heat, breaking into pieces with spatula, until water has mostly evaporated and mixture resembles scrambled eggs.
Remove from heat. Add sausage crumbles to VeganEggs and stir until evenly mixed.
Remove dough from packaging and separate into triangles.
Divide sausage and egg substitute evenly among 8 triangles. Top each with 1 tablespoon of shredded cheddar. Top with remaining 8 sheets of dough and crimp edges with fork. Brush with melted butter or ghee.
Insert crisper plate into air fryer and insert basket into unit. Preheat 3 minutes to 400 degrees on Air Fry setting, then place two pockets on crisper plate and cook for 3 1/2 minutes or until pastry has risen and is golden brown. Repeat with remaining pockets. Serve warm.

 

Yes, You Can Make Eggless Scrambled Eggs

Occasionally when posting recipes I’ve mentioned that my son is allergic to eggs. He’s 14 years old now, so over the years I’ve learned how to make an eggless version of just about everything he wants to eat, except, of course, eggs. It broke my heart when he asked me what an omelet tasted like and I couldn’t make that for him.

Don’t even talk to me about tofu. Here’s how that went: Extensive research of tofu omelet recipes. Chose recipe that seemed to embody all prevailing ingredients and had most appealing photo. Cooked omelet. Tasted omelet. Scraped entire omelet into trash. Realized recipe supposedly tasting like eggs was created by person who hadn’t had one in years, if ever.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

It looks like an egg carton, but you’ll find VeganEgg in the baking aisle.

So I went on as always, frustrated because no one had invented an egg replacer that acts like an egg.  Then I spotted an egg carton-shaped container on the shelf in the baking aisle at my grocery store. Brilliant marketing move on the part of Follow Your Heart for VeganEgg because I’m thinking something’s wrong! These eggs should be refrigerated! I picked it up, read the label, and with much skepticism, tossed it in my cart, thinking if it couldn’t really make scrambled eggs, I could still use it in baked goods like my usual powdered egg replacer.

My son was excited and wanted me to make the scrambled “eggs” as soon as possible. I was worried about getting his hopes up. First of all, my experience with vegan products has often left much to be desired (I’m looking at you, “cheese”). Second, my son is a very picky eater, and often it has to do with texture. With a powdered product to make eggs, a texture he’s never experienced before even when it’s the real thing, I figured chances of success were slim to none, but I had to give it a shot.

The result? A miracle. VeganEgg takes a little longer to cook than eggs, but it ends up looking pretty much like the real deal. The instructions said to whisk the water and powder, but I mixed it in the Nutribullet because, I don’t know; I put everything in the Nutribullet. I added a little salt while cooking it, then finished it with a sprinkling of shredded cheddar to up my chances of approval. My son the picky eater asked for pepper, then proceeded to gobble the whole thing, and he asked for it again a couple of days later. I don’t know how to explain how this makes me feel after having watched him not be able to have eggs like everybody else for all these years.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

VeganEgg egg substitute starts out looking like yellow cake batter.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

VeganEgg egg substitute, scrambled. I found that a heavy stainless steel skillet works best; it took longer to cook them in a nonstick skillet.

The next week I made french toast, another thing I’ve never been able to replicate without eggs, using the recipe on the back of the VeganEgg package. Again, skeptical. Again, miracle. This wasn’t just good vegan french toast. This was some of the best french toast I’ve ever had, period. My husband, not vegan, had four slices. My son loved it and has eaten it again since.

I haven’t tried making an omelet with it. Supposedly you can, but I’m not sure I have the patience to wait around for an omelet to cook when it’s going to taste the same.

You can still find the recipe for Classic French Toast on VeganEgg package, and they recently released The VeganEgg Cookbook, which I can’t wait to check out.

 

Root Beer Pulled Pork the Hard Way

Pulled pork sandwich on a white plate with sweet potato fries.

Slow Cooker Root Beer Pulled Pork and sweet potato fries cooked in the air fryer because I like to use as many gadgets as possible.

If you cook at home and are inclined to things like pulled pork, you’ve probably heard of root beer pulled pork. Easiest thing in the world: Throw a bottle of root beer in the slow cooker, plop a pork roast in, cook. So I don’t mean to be misleading with that headline. Slow cooker pulled pork is not difficult.

However, it’s not without its issues. For one thing, root beer. Option one is to buy a six-pack of pricey craft-brewed root beer, then figure out what to do with the other five since we don’t normally drink soda, and never with sugar. Hey, we may eat pork and throw chemicals on it, but we have some rules to live by.

The other option is to buy a 2,000-pack of diet root beer, and then we end up drinking diet root beer until it’s gone, which is even worse than drinking five fancy root beers.

I found my solution when I went to a party where a friend was drinking hard root beer. You see where I’m going with this. Huge epiphany. Root beer, pork, alcohol — there’s no going wrong here, and leftover hard root beer is not a problem because alcohol.

Actually there is one way to go wrong here. The first time I tried this, I used a pork loin roast. This is a lean cut and, of course, healthier. It made pulled pork with a nice root beer flavor, but it was not as tender as it could have been. Use a pork butt or pork shoulder roast instead.

Serve with whole wheat hamburger buns and sweet potato fries to try to maintain some nutritional dignity.

Slow Cooker Root Beer Pulled Pork

1 2-pound pork butt or pork shoulder roast
1 bottle hard root beer
Sea salt and and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Barbecue sauce
Hamburger buns
Shredded cabbage if desired

Place roast in slow cooker. Pour root beer over roast. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours or high for 4 hours. Drain liquid from pan. Pull meat apart with two forks until all shredded. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and stir. Serve on hamburger buns, topped with barbecue sauce and, if desired, shredded cabbage.

 

Chicken Parmesan with Crunch and a Little Kick

Heart-shaped ravioli and chicken parmesan with red sauce on a white plate.

Chicken parmesan with heart-shaped ravioli, because it was Valentine’s Day.

First of all, ignore the heart-shaped ravioli, unless it’s Valentine’s Day again and it’s time for heart-shaped ravioli. If that’s the case, I made the ravioli below with this recipe using a small heart-shaped cookie cutter.

Today I want to talk about chicken Parmesan. (That’s the little cheese-covered thing below the ravioli. Trust me, there’s crunchy breaded chicken under there.)

Over the years I’ve seen a lot of chicken Parm that is breaded, fried, and then covered with sauce and cheese and baked. I always wondered why you would want to bother with breading and frying something if you’re just going to make it all soggy by covering it with liquid and baking it. I like to make it my mom’s way, which had a nice contrast in textures between the crispy breading, melted cheese and marinara sauce. I’ve healthied my version up a little, using oven-fried chicken with a whole-wheat panko coating. Mom didn’t have panko back in the day.

I also like to put in a little surprise secret ingredient: I stick a little sliver of pepper jack cheese under the mozzarella. Not so much that you’re going, “Hey, a burrito!” Just enough to add a little kick.

I start with oven-fried chicken adapted from the Oven Fried Chicken with Almonds recipe in the South Beach Diet Cookbook. I use whole wheat panko crumbs instead of breadcrumbs and change the herbs according to whim. Also, the original recipe calls for pounding chicken breasts, but I’ve found that it’s quicker and easier to buy thin-sliced chicken breasts. You don’t have to go through the mess of pounding (though my son really liked that part) and the chicken seems to turn out more tender.

Chicken Parmesan

1 cup whole wheat panko crumbs
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup raw almonds
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
Pinch of ground black pepper
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 1/4 pound thin-sliced chicken breasts*
Pepper jack cheese, sliced
Mozzarella cheese slices
Marinara sauce

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
In a food processor, process almonds until finely chopped. Add panko crumbs, grated Parmesan, garlic, salt, oregano, and pepper. Process until combined. Empty mixture into a medium bowl. Pour olive oil into a shallow bowl.
Dip chicken breasts in olive oil, then dredge in the panko mixture and arrange on a baking sheet.
Bake for 25 minutes, or until thermometer inserted into the center of a piece registers 170 degrees.
Top each piece of chicken with a small slice of pepper jack cheese and top with sliced mozzarella. Allow cheese to melt, then top with marinara and serve.
*There will be enough breading for about two pounds of chicken, if you want to open another package. I just use what comes in a standard package, which is usually a little under a pound and a quarter.

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