Daily Archives: February 24, 2019

Yes, You Can Make Eggless Scrambled Eggs

Occasionally when posting recipes I’ve mentioned that my son is allergic to eggs. He’s 14 years old now, so over the years I’ve learned how to make an eggless version of just about everything he wants to eat, except, of course, eggs. It broke my heart when he asked me what an omelet tasted like and I couldn’t make that for him.

Don’t even talk to me about tofu. Here’s how that went: Extensive research of tofu omelet recipes. Chose recipe that seemed to embody all prevailing ingredients and had most appealing photo. Cooked omelet. Tasted omelet. Scraped entire omelet into trash. Realized recipe supposedly tasting like eggs was created by person who hadn’t had one in years, if ever.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

It looks like an egg carton, but you’ll find VeganEgg in the baking aisle.

So I went on as always, frustrated because no one had invented an egg replacer that acts like an egg.  Then I spotted an egg carton-shaped container on the shelf in the baking aisle at my grocery store. Brilliant marketing move on the part of Follow Your Heart for VeganEgg because I’m thinking something’s wrong! These eggs should be refrigerated! I picked it up, read the label, and with much skepticism, tossed it in my cart, thinking if it couldn’t really make scrambled eggs, I could still use it in baked goods like my usual powdered egg replacer.

My son was excited and wanted me to make the scrambled “eggs” as soon as possible. I was worried about getting his hopes up. First of all, my experience with vegan products has often left much to be desired (I’m looking at you, “cheese”). Second, my son is a very picky eater, and often it has to do with texture. With a powdered product to make eggs, a texture he’s never experienced before even when it’s the real thing, I figured chances of success were slim to none, but I had to give it a shot.

The result? A miracle. VeganEgg takes a little longer to cook than eggs, but it ends up looking pretty much like the real deal. The instructions said to whisk the water and powder, but I mixed it in the Nutribullet because, I don’t know; I put everything in the Nutribullet. I added a little salt while cooking it, then finished it with a sprinkling of shredded cheddar to up my chances of approval. My son the picky eater asked for pepper, then proceeded to gobble the whole thing, and he asked for it again a couple of days later. I don’t know how to explain how this makes me feel after having watched him not be able to have eggs like everybody else for all these years.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

VeganEgg egg substitute starts out looking like yellow cake batter.

VeganEgg_egg_substitute

VeganEgg egg substitute, scrambled. I found that a heavy stainless steel skillet works best; it took longer to cook them in a nonstick skillet.

The next week I made french toast, another thing I’ve never been able to replicate without eggs, using the recipe on the back of the VeganEgg package. Again, skeptical. Again, miracle. This wasn’t just good vegan french toast. This was some of the best french toast I’ve ever had, period. My husband, not vegan, had four slices. My son loved it and has eaten it again since.

I haven’t tried making an omelet with it. Supposedly you can, but I’m not sure I have the patience to wait around for an omelet to cook when it’s going to taste the same.

You can still find the recipe for Classic French Toast on VeganEgg package, and they recently released The VeganEgg Cookbook, which I can’t wait to check out.

 

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